The guide to Krk, Croatia: where to swim and eat some čevapčiči

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The guide to Krk, Croatia

I’ve already managed to give you an insight into living on an island but this time I’m here to share the guide to Krk, Croatia with all its secret perks and places to visit.

 

The overall feeling of Krk, Croatia is a typical holiday-island-kind-of-vibe.

People have come here to relax, to enjoy their time off. They have stuffed their cars with beach equipment and packed their wallets with money, ready to sleep, swim, eat and drink.

There aren’t many locals. Most people have come from the mainland of Croatia, Slovenia and Italy to enjoy their summer houses, rent an apartment for a weekend or make a family getaway on their yacht.

People around here are low-key and you’ll manage to find all kinds of combos. Not so much of lone travelers but many couples and families of all ages.

I consider this a great place to relax: it’s easy going, everything is simple, there are no specific requirements of what or how you need to be. Just be chill.

The guide to Krk Island in Croatia

The guide to Krk, Croatia

Tips to keep in mind before going to Krk, Croatia

  • The island of Krk is connected to the mainland with a bridge so car-traveling is a big thing over here.
  • There is no easily accessible public transportation except for some ferry rides and a small “train” going from city to city.
  • The streets in most of the island villages are rather small and narrow, people are walking all over the place and drivers must be extra careful.
  • There are only several big shops all over the island and most of them are packed with people from early morning until late night.
  • Most of the beaches are with bigger or smaller rocks but there are ways of getting into the sea in most of them. Some have pool-like entrances in the sea.
  • Paddings for sleeping on rocks can be purchased in all of the small beach-shops (that are surprisingly cheap)
  • Most of the small cities have all kinds of concerts and festivals through weekends. Worth checking out!
  • While there are ports all over the shore, there rarely are any big ferries except for the bigger cities.
  • There is no need to take anything but the swimsuit since it’ll be an acceptable clothing in any of the situations.
  • The weather is changing like CRAZY, it is possible that no prediction will be correct.

 

Cities to visit in Krk, Croatia

Porat

Porat was the location of our apartment. While there isn’t much to see in the town itself, it’s a really wonderful location to visit.

The city has only a few small restaurants by the port but their Restaurant Piccola Venezia gives HUGE portions with a damn-tasty food for very budget-friendly prices (around 10 euros per person, food + drink). 

Near Porat, there is a nice hiking trail through olive gardens to the seashore with yachts and hidden beaches. If you’re somewhat a hiking (or biking) nerd, this is a great place to give a go.

There’s also a lovely beach with beautiful views and the option to rent sups, kayaks, etc, on the beach by Hotel Pinia.

Malinska

Malinska is another city near the same area of the island but it’s a bit bigger than Porat and is considered to be the center of the Northern part of Krk.

By Malinska, you’ll find one of the biggest beaches of the area – but it’s also one of the most crowded ones.

Within a walking distance, the scenery might change a bit, offering fewer people and more free space. It can also be a matter of your luck.

My favorite part of Malinska was its port with several great spots to eat and drink. While Porat had only around 3 active restaurants, there are plenty to choose from in Malinska.

Our absolute favorite of Malinska was Kings Caffe: brewery with amazing beer (which is a pretty uncommon thing around Croatia), friendly prices and great foods. Simple yet amazing. Oh, and they had the best music, fascinating view and friendly personal, speaking in many different languages (another uncommon thing around here).

Krk

City Krk is the capital of the island and it’s also the hotspot of everything, as you might’ve guessed.

I’d never change living in Porat for living in Krk tho…

The city of Krk is insanely crowded, touristy and really full of people. It was literally impossible to find a parking spot nearby the center (we drove around the city two times just to get a spot from a person leaving).

The city is really beautiful, with a nice old center, a beautiful cathedral and charming narrow streets which reminded me of Venice once in a while (hello, claustrophobia!)

It’s also offering TONS of shop, restaurant, bar and market options. If you’re up for some shopping, don’t miss this chance. (I mean, food and beach-accessories).

It’s nice to visit it for a bit but it takes only an hour or two to walk around the whole city and discover it inside out. Besides that, it’s a lot of uphill/downhill kind of walking that can get exhausting really fast.

Omišalj

It was my absolute favorite to visit!

Streets of Omišalj are really magical. Wherever you go, you feel like you’re in a garden of a local. Tiny streets full of grapes (free to eat!), no people around, beautiful flowerpots, small doors. No tourists. Only a local or two.

It was rather hard to find ANY open food spot although we were there on Saturday’s afternoon. The day was saved by Restoran Kaštel. While the place doesn’t look magnificent from the outside, the food offer is really good and, after all, any open restaurant is better than no restaurant at all.

And while the small streets are really wonderful, notice that the actual distance between the port, seaside and the center of the city is a way bigger than it looks like since the city center is uphill.

 

Is Krk, Croatia worth a visit? 

Overall it was a nice vacation to have before continuing my travels to more crowded cities and places in Croatia, Italy and Portugal. I got what I was going for – tons of sun, blue and crazy salty sea and wonderful views wherever you look.

Are you planning to visit Krk soon or have already been there? Let me know your questions or impressions! 

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